Medical Dermatology 

ROSACEA

Rosacea is a common skin condition that causes redness and visible blood vessels in your face.

Medical Dermatology  

ROSACEA

Rosacea is a common skin condition that causes redness and visible blood vessels in your face.

What is Rosacea?

Rosacea is a common skin condition that can affect anyone. But it’s most common in middle-aged women who have light skin. There’s no cure for rosacea, but treatment can control and reduce the signs and symptoms.

What are the symptoms of Rosacea?

Signs and symptoms of rosacea include:

Facial redness: Rosacea usually causes a persistent redness in the central part of the face. Blood vessels on your nose and cheeks will often swell and become visible.

Swollen, red bumps: Many people with Rosacea develop pimples on their face that often resemble acne. These bumps sometimes contain pus and your skin may feel hot and tender.

Eye problems: Many patient with Rosacea also experience dry, irritated, swollen eyes and eyelids. This is known as ocular rosacea. In some people, the eye symptoms precede the skin symptoms.

Enlarged nose: Rosacea can thicken the skin on the nose, causing the nose to appear bulbous (rhinophyma). This occurs more often in men than in women.

    What are the treatments of Rosacea?

     

    Prescription drugs for rosacea include:

    Topical drugs that reduce redness. For mild to moderate rosacea, your doctor may prescribe a cream or gel that you apply to the affected skin. Brimonidine (Mirvaso) and oxymetazoline (Rhofade) reduce redness by constricting blood vessels. You may see results within 12 hours after use. The effect on the blood vessels is temporary, so the medication needs to be applied regularly to maintain improvements.

    Oral antibiotics. Your doctor may prescribe an oral antibiotic such as doxycycline (Oracea, others) for moderate to severe rosacea with bumps and pimples.

    Oral acne drug. If you have severe rosacea that doesn’t respond to other therapies, your doctor may suggest isotretinoin (Amnesteem, Claravis, others). It’s a powerful oral acne drug that also helps clear up acnelike lesions of rosacea. Don’t use this drug during pregnancy as it can cause serious birth defects.

    Therapies

    • Laser therapy and other light-based therapies may help reduce the redness of enlarged blood vessels. Repeat treatments may be needed periodically to maintain the improved appearance of your skin.

    Email Us

    What is Rosacea?

    Rosacea is a common skin condition that can affect anyone. But it’s most common in middle-aged women who have light skin. There’s no cure for rosacea, but treatment can control and reduce the signs and symptoms.

    What are the symptoms of Rosacea?

    Signs and symptoms of rosacea include:

    Facial redness: Rosacea usually causes a persistent redness in the central part of the face. Blood vessels on your nose and cheeks will often swell and become visible.

    Swollen, red bumps: Many people with Rosacea develop pimples on their face that often resemble acne. These bumps sometimes contain pus and your skin may feel hot and tender.

    Eye problems: Many patient with Rosacea also experience dry, irritated, swollen eyes and eyelids. This is known as ocular rosacea. In some people, the eye symptoms precede the skin symptoms.

    Enlarged nose: Rosacea can thicken the skin on the nose, causing the nose to appear bulbous (rhinophyma). This occurs more often in men than in women.

    What are the treatments of Rosacea?

    Prescription drugs for rosacea include:

    Topical drugs that reduce redness. For mild to moderate rosacea, your doctor may prescribe a cream or gel that you apply to the affected skin. Brimonidine (Mirvaso) and oxymetazoline (Rhofade) reduce redness by constricting blood vessels. You may see results within 12 hours after use. The effect on the blood vessels is temporary, so the medication needs to be applied regularly to maintain improvements.

    Oral antibiotics. Your doctor may prescribe an oral antibiotic such as doxycycline (Oracea, others) for moderate to severe rosacea with bumps and pimples.

    Oral acne drug. If you have severe rosacea that doesn’t respond to other therapies, your doctor may suggest isotretinoin (Amnesteem, Claravis, others). It’s a powerful oral acne drug that also helps clear up acnelike lesions of rosacea. Don’t use this drug during pregnancy as it can cause serious birth defects.

    Therapies

    Laser therapy and other light-based therapies may help reduce the redness of enlarged blood vessels. Repeat treatments may be needed periodically to maintain the improved appearance of your skin.

    Email Us

    Come on In!

    Weekdays

    08:30 AM -5:30 PM

    Weekends

    Closed 

    Contact

    Mail

    info@advanceddermatologyinstitute.com

    Address

    3655 Lomita Blvd, Ste 215
    Los Angeles, CA 90505

    1360 W. 6 St, W. Bldg. Ste 245
    San Pedro, CA 90732

    %d bloggers like this: